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Learning in Kindergarten

In Kindergarten, your child will have many opportunities to learn, build skills, develop social relationships and become familiar with the routines of school. The Kindergarten program includes four frames: Belonging and Contributing, Self-Regulation and Well-Being, Demonstrating Literacy and Mathematics Behaviours, and Problem Solving and Innovating. These four frames aligns with the way children’s learning naturally occurs and that focuses on aspects of learning that are critical to young children’s development. (The Kindergarten Program, 2016,  p.13-15)

Play is a vehicle for learning and rests at the core of innovation and creativity. It has long been acknowledged that there is a strong link between play and learning for young children, especially in the areas of problem solving, language acquisition, literacy, and mathematics, as well as the development
of social, physical, and emotional skills (NAEYC, 2009; Fullan, 2013; Ontario Ministry of Education, 2014c). The four frames reflect the integrated way in which learning occurs during children’s play and inquiry in Kindergarten.” (The Kindergarten Program, 2016, p.18)

You will receive communication about your child’s development in many ways throughout the school year where educators will share with you growth of your child. You will receive three formal written reports during the school year called The Communication of Learning. It is also important for you to share information about your child with the teacher. If you have questions or concerns, please contact staff at the school.

 

Learn More
Visit our Kindergarten Links and Resources page to learn more about the TDSB's kindergarten program, including frequently asked questions and home tips on preparing your child for school. 

Our View of Children

All children are competent, capable of complex thinking, curious and rich in potential and experience.

The Kindergarten Program 2016, p. 10

Belonging2

ProbSolving2


All students can succeed. Each student has his or her own unique patterns of learning.

Learning for All, K-12, 2013, p. 7

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